4 Reasons to Become a Culinary Arts Professional

The advantages of becoming a culinary arts professional!

Are you mesmerized by watching those cooking shows on TV? Maybe you want to cook a steak as well as Bobby Flay or bake a cake as well as any of the other celebrity chefs or Food Network stars.

If you have a passion for preparing and presenting food, then consider entering a culinary arts training program with the ITHSA!

Going to culinary arts training school can help you gain the experience and professional skills you need to enter a career field where you can create delicious dishes and learn how to present aesthetically-pleasing plates.

It will give you the skills you need to advance your career and put you on the path to learning about the food industry.

Here are five reasons to become a culinary arts professional:

1. A variety of career opportunities

Culinary arts training can give you the skills you need to help safely prepare food and present it in a prompt time and visually pleasing way.There are a broad range of opportunities within the culinary arts fields. Career paths range from members of the preparation staff to head chef. With further education, you can even specialize in a specific area of the culinary arts, such as pastries. To become a chef, you could work your way up as you gain more experience. With a culinary arts education, you have the ability to start in professional environments and advance your career.

You could become a:

  • Restaurant cook
  • Prep/line cook
  • Short order cook
  • Assistant chef
  • Personal chef
  • Pastry chef
  • Baker
  • Catering specialist
  • Dessert specialist

Once you get more experience and further your education, the possibilities could be endless.

2. Work in different environments

According to theOccupational Outlook Handbook cooks can work in many places other than just restaurants. They may also work in cafeterias in schools or hospitals, nursing care facilities, government establishments, or food service companies. Most cooks work in restaurants and, with so many offerings, you could try to find a job working with a specific style of food.

3. Hands-on training

A culinary arts training program can give you the experience you need for your resume. Courses will help prepare you for food safety, professionalism, and ethical practices within the cooking school. At a training program at Branfrod Hall, you can take courses that include food sanitation, restaurant management, restaurant marketing, and wine and beer beverages to name a few! You’ll also learn how to cook in a variety of distinct and creative ways.

4. Try new flavors

An education in culinary school can give you the opportunity to try new flavors and experiment with the creation of dishes. You will be educated in flavor pairings and profiles that will help give you the foundation you need so you have the potential to create culinary masterpieces. You may even learn what spices are traditional in different ethnic cuisines. At Branford Hall, you can take a course in International cuisines from Europe and Africa. Plus, you will have the ability to taste them!

Attending culinary arts school may be a great option for anyone who loves cooking in active and lively environments. You can gain the knowledge of different and exotic flavors and much more! This exciting profession could be one that not only stimulates the senses, but your creativity as well!

 

Find our more about the ITH Culinary Programmes here!

Source: http://www.brandfordhall.edu

 

 

Career Opportunities with Culinary Qualifications

The ITH Culinary programmes provide students with both the theory and practical cookery skills needed to pursue a career in the field of Professional Cookery. We explore 10 career options these qualifications can give you access to.

Commis chefs/Line cooks

Line Cook Working in KitchenCommis chefs are very similar to trainee chefs. They learn on the job how to prepare different types of meals and various cooking techniques. They need to know all the health and safety rules of the kitchen and they work their way up in the kitchen ranks by starting as a Commis chef and learning the very basics of cooking.

Chef de Partie

Usually the Chef de Partie is assigned a specific section of the menu to focus on like starters, desserts, meat section, fish section and so on. They are responsible for cooking everything on the menu in that section. It almost always relates to a section on the hot station however there are exceptions.

Chef de Partie stylising a cake

Sous Chef

A Sous chef is one just below an Executive Chef so the position is a very responsible one. The sous chef assists the Executive Chef in managing the kitchen, its staff, its stock or inventory, its menu, supplies and so. Sous chefs may be responsible for creating new dishes, training junior chefs, managing the pass, and more.

Sous Chef Posing for Picture

Pastry Chef

A pastry chef or pâtissier is a chef who works in a professional kitchen or usually within the kitchen brigade, and is skilled in the making of pastries, cakes, desserts, breads and other sweet or savoury baked goods. Most pastry chefs work in large hotels, restaurants, bakeries or bistros. The Pastry chef may be responsible for testing, tasting and developing new recipes for desserts and pastries, menu planning, sanitation and food safety, admin duties, budgeting, purchasing of fresh fruits and other fresh goods or supervising other staff/chefs in the kitchen.

Pastry Chef making puff pastrys

Chocolatier

Simply put, a chocolatier is a person who works passionately with chocolate to design, create and sculpt masterpieces. They are a rare bread these days as many exquisite chocolates are made by large (and well known) chocolate companies using expensive equipment or even machines. There’s no shame in that. However, the chocolatier is able to impart their own uniqueness to each and every chocolate delight and it often takes them years and years to perfect the craft… what a treat and a very special job to do.

Chocolatier working with chocolate

Food stylist

Food stylists are becoming a more popular career trend. Once you know how to prepare delicious food, you need to learn how to plate the food so that it looks as good as it takes. Whilst plating techniques are covered in culinary arts training, some very artistic chefs are able to take the look of the food to the next level. Magazine, publications, recipe book authors and more are employing food stylists to help represent visually the food that they are preparing. A good eye for detail is essential.

Food Stylist plating food

Private Chef

This is often quite a unique and special job as it usually involves catering for a private household or celebrity. It involves preparing menus based on seasonal ingredients, dietary requirements and so on, and then preparing, cooking and serving meals to high-end clients as and when required. It may also involve travelling with the client to other venues and destinations to prepare food.

Recipe Developer

A recipe developer is someone who mixes art and creativity with the science of cooking. Having a solid culinary background helps those who wish to extend their culinary careers in to recipe development because it grounds students in the knowledge of textures, flavours and ingredients, and how they could or should work together. The ability to test and try out new ideas by combining scientific understandings of how cooking process and ingredients work, as well as using an artistic and fun approach to cooking makes for a successful developer. Of course, the ability to write all of these recipes, quantities and methods down in a readable and understandable format is paramount!

Caterer

A caterer is a chef who prepares food for events either on site or off site. The caterer is responsible for dealing with a client, arranging food to be prepared and delivered, set up, served and cleared from a venue. Caterers often provide food at venues where weddings, baby showers, cocktail parties etc are taking place. A caterer must hold a license to prepare food and serve food. A solid culinary grounding is essential for this sort of job role.

Executive Chef

It is not common for Culinary Arts students to walk straight into Executive Chef Positions however in some cases where a hotel or a restaurant is small, culinary arts graduates are snapped up to fill these roles. Typically though an executive chef is the most senior chef role and is usually reserved for large chef brigades where the executive chef will supervise all other chefs, create menus, order stock items and maintain the food or kitchen budget. In small hotels or restaurants, the executive chef is usually responsible for the cooking as well.

 

We hope you feel inspired to start a career in the culinary arts profession. If you have any queries or you would like to know more visit our Culinary programmes – https://www.ith.org.za/culinary-programmes/

 

Source: https://www.hotelschool.co.za/

SA Culinary Olympic Squad Appear On My Kitchen Rules South Africa

Members of the South African Culinary Olympic squad along with team manager made a surprise guest appearance on the latest People’s Choice Challenge episode of My Kitchen Rules SA which aired on Sunday 2 September on M-Net.

In celebration of Heritage Month, the seven remaining teams competing on My Kitchen Rules SA were faced with another dynamic People’s Choice challenge which took each team to a different destination around South Africa. On arrival at their destination they were tasked with sourcing unique ingredients synonymous with that destination, then returning to the #MKRSA Kitchen HQ for a culinary showdown where the chefs of the South African Culinary Olympic squad were waiting to judge their efforts in a blind tasting alongside the show’s celebrity judges, David Higgs and J’Something.

The eight highly qualified and skilled chefs, who are among members of the squad that may be representing South Africa in the Culinary Olympics in Stuttgart in 2020, were:

  • Trevor Boyd (team manager) – Executive Chef, Michelangelo Towers
  • Henrico Grobbelaar – Executive Chef, NH Lord Charles
  • Oscar Baard – Pastry Chef, NH Lord Charles
  • Dion Vengatass – Chef de Cuisine, Belmond Mount Nelson Hotel
  • Jaen-Mari Breytenbach – Chef de Partie: Pastry, Sun International Time Square
  • Aphelele Dlungana – Chef De Partie, The Roundhouse Restaurant
  • Burton Leo – Head Chef, The Camps Bay Retreat Boutique Hotel
  • Adrian Vigus-Brown – Chef de Cuisine, African Pride Melrose Arch Hotel, Autograph Collection

The Culinary Squad is a diverse collection of chefs which mirrors the diversity of cultures of which South Africa is proudly made up.

And the judges said…

The ‘Olympic chefs turned judges for a day’ were impressed with the some of the dishes they judged in the blind tasting. Henrico Grobbelaar – who has represented South Africa on an international level a number of times – particularly enjoyed the venison dish and had this to say: “The stakes are high and the prize money is definitely worth the effort in this competition; so I think towards the end of the competition contestants will be able to apply new cooking techniques they have learned throughout the competition.”

Dion Vengatass, who was also a member of the Olympic Culinary team in 2016, commented: “I don’t usually eat tripe unless it has been prepared by my aunt, my grandmother or myself; but the tripe served during our this episode of MKRSA was surprisingly good.”

For some of the chefs it was the first time they were on the other side of the judging process which was as exciting as it was entertaining, but the more seasoned chefs enjoyed it just as much with most saying they did not expect such a high standard.

 

Source: https://www.hospitalitymarketplace.co.za/

Overcoming the odds through determination & food

It’s always great to hear wonderful stories about determination and making the most out of a bad situation, but it feels all the more sweeter when the story features one our very own UK culinary centres, Vaughan’s Cookery School.

On their most recent professional cookery course, Vaughan’s had the interesting and rewarding experience of having two refugees from Syria, Mohamad and Kam, who, although they both came from Homs, did not know each other there, Kam being a married lady, while Mohamed is a single man.

Although both of them already had excellent culinary skills, they needed to understand more about European-style dishes and cooking techniques to increase their chances of getting a job in the industry. They successfully completed the Confederation of Tourism and Hospitality Level 2 Award in Culinary Skills and passed with flying colours. Their places on the course were sponsored by Building Bridges, a project funded through The Big Lottery Fund, which is designed to help anyone who is unemployed increase their chances of gaining employment. The opportunity was made available to anyone registered on the Building Bridges scheme but it was only these two refugees who took up the challenge. They are now ready and willing to find employment in the food sector.

Homs is the third largest city in Syria after Aleppo and Damascus and much of it was destroyed in a much-publicised siege. Both Mohamad and Kam had to leave with their respective families as they fled for their lives. To arrive in a new and unfamiliar country with no money, no possessions and no ability to speak the language, having gone through trauma and disruption that the civil war created, is something that most of us can’t even begin to imagine.

Mohamad worked in his Uncle’s bakery for many years and then set up his own café/restaurant, selling savoury and sweet pastries as take-away items to help make the business profitable. On the course he showed his skill, not just in his ability to cook delicious food, but also in his knife skills and his knowledge of ingredients and how to ‘marry’ them well.

Kam didn’t have a background in catering but had always enjoyed cooking and demonstrated on the course that she has an amazing palate. She can create interesting flavours, not just in the traditional food she is used to making, but also can add a ‘twist’ and ‘zing’ to European-style dishes with equal flair.

As well as achieving this professional qualification, they also improved their English so that they are now excited and ready to take on a job in the catering industry and be an asset to any employer, particularly if they are encouraged to use their Syrian ‘flair’ for creating taste and flavour.

 

Source: https://www.cthawards.com/

, ,

How a college can get accredited

The ITHSA is the official representing agent of the CTH and hence we will be able to assist you with the process of accreditation, registering of students and programme information.

To get started, the training provider needs to make contact with the ITHSA Business team, the consultant will provide the training provider with the ITHSA accreditation application.

ITHSA provider accreditation, this is the procedure:

  1. Complete the ITHSA accreditation application form in duplicate, submit one copy to the ITHSA and retain a copy for your records.
  2. Pay the Provider accreditation fee via EFT then save a copy of your proof of payment. This needs to be submitted together with the application form to ITHSA.
  3. The application pack can be sent either by post or electronically to info@ith.org.za. A VAT invoice is available from ITHSA upon request.
  4. Once your application is received by ITHSA a desktop review is conducted and then a site visit is conducted.

After a successful site visit, ITHSA will make the recommendation to CTH for accreditation.

The centre accreditation fee is R 7700.00.  This fee is inclusive of the site visit, CTH application fee, a full set of materials for students and lecturers and an accreditation certificate.

Please feel free to contact our Business Development Consultant Mitchell Miles via email: mitchellm.ith.org.za if you require more details on how to get accredited.

 

What programmes does the ITHSA offer?

We offer the following three study streams, that are registered on the United Kingdom’s National Qualifications Frameworks:

  • Management Programmes in Tourism and Hospitality
  • Culinary Programmes
  • Short Learning Programmes

 

What makes ITHSA programmes different?

What makes ITH courses different, is that we offer more than just theory, but an informed view of life in the field of tourism and hospitality. Students leave feeling prepared emotionally and intellectually for the task of serving others. The ITHSA offers a set of progressive internationally recognised programmes such as Management Programmes in Tourism and Hospitality, Culinary Programmes or Professional Skills short courses.

Our courses are endorsed by important industry figures and brands, including Gordon Ramsay and his Tante Marie Culinary Academy, Virgin Atlantic, the Star Alliance, Sabre and many more.

 

What will I get if my application was successful?

As an ITH training centre, you will receive full support from us including but not limited to:

  • Advice
  • Accreditation support
  • Registration of students for assessments and exams
  • Distribution of learner tool kits
  • Help to grow student and centre base in SA
  • Seek local endorsements for qualifications
  • Develop relationships with industry experts in SA
  • A Facebook page of over 6000+ interested students to market to* – post about your college on our page for a limited time only!
  • Registered with the OFQAL in the UK, all programmes can be offered through face to face classes or distance learning
  • All programmes come with a full set of learning material for both the college and students
  • These vocational based courses that are easy to manage from a college perspective as the assessment is either via an assignment or an exam that is set and marked in the UK.

 

How does the assessment work?

These vocational based courses are easy to manage from a college perspective as the assessment is either via an assignment or an exam that is set and marked in the UK.  As a South African provider, you will receive full support from the SA office.

 

The 9 Types Of Cooks Who Work In Fine Dining Restaurants

Every restaurant has at least one of them.

1. The Fine-Dining Bro:

How to spot one: These cooks are covered in tattoos of cleavers, whisks, and pork cuts, carry a pair of plating tweezers on them at all times, and prefer small plates to large portions. They are most commonly found in gastropubs, fine-dining restaurants, pop-up events, and farm-to-table institutions, and they have the biggest ego in the kitchen.Favorite thing to cook: Anything sous vide (have they mentioned they're the best at using a Cryovac machine? Here, let them show you!), Asian fusion, molecular gastronomy, tapas (with a modern twist), and anything that has a spoon drag or quenelle on the plate.Favorite sayings: "Make it soigné.""When you work with the best ingredients, everything you add to them is just taking away from their natural beauty.""Blank space on a plate gives the food room to breathe."

Charlotte Gomez / BuzzFeed

How to spot one: These cooks are covered in tattoos of cleavers, whisks, and pork cuts, carry a pair of plating tweezers on them at all times, and prefer small plates to large portions. They are most commonly found in gastropubs, fine-dining restaurants, pop-up events, and farm-to-table institutions, and they have the biggest ego in the kitchen.

Favorite thing to cook: Anything sous vide (have they mentioned they’re the best at using a Cryovac machine? Here, let them show you!), Asian fusion, molecular gastronomy, tapas (with a modern twist), and anything that has a spoon drag or quenelle on the plate.

Favorite sayings:

“Make it soigné.”

“When you work with the best ingredients, everything you add to them is just taking away from their natural beauty.”

“Blank space on a plate gives the food room to breathe.”

2. The Drill Sergeant:

How to spot one: Also called yellers, these individuals are your classic manage-by-fear chefs. They continue the outdated practice of running a hostile kitchen and believe the best way to improve their team is to "break them down to build them up." This personality type remains popular due to the portrayal of chefs on reality TV and movies. They also love to throw shit and make their point heard.Favorite thing to cook: Vegetable stock made from the onion scraps you got caught trying to throw away (to teach you a lesson on food waste).Favorite sayings: "If you have time to lean, you have time to clean!"“This is the way I was trained, and this is the way you will be trained.""Culinary students have no work ethic these days!"

Charlotte Gomez / BuzzFeed

How to spot one: Also called yellers, these individuals are your classic manage-by-fear chefs. They continue the outdated practice of running a hostile kitchen and believe the best way to improve their team is to “break them down to build them up.” This personality type remains popular due to the portrayal of chefs on reality TV and movies. They also love to throw shit and make their point heard.

Favorite thing to cook: Vegetable stock made from the onion scraps you got caught trying to throw away (to teach you a lesson on food waste).

Favorite sayings:

“If you have time to lean, you have time to clean!”

“This is the way I was trained, and this is the way you will be trained.”

“Culinary students have no work ethic these days!”

3. The Recent Culinary School Grad:

How to spot one: These cooks arrive 20 minutes early wearing checkered pants, an ironed coat, and a toque. They suggest alternative methods to already established procedures based on their schooling and expect to become head chef within a year. Their most recent Google searches include "pâte à choux ratio" and "student load forgiveness."Favorite things to cook: Chicken with fines herbes, consommé, and tourné potatoes.Favorite sayings: "In culinary school I was taught that you should peel tomatoes before adding them to a sauce.""I've been working here for three months and haven't been promoted to sous chef yet. This is bullshit!"

Charlotte Gomez / BuzzFeed

How to spot one: These cooks arrive 20 minutes early wearing checkered pants, an ironed coat, and a toque. They suggest alternative methods to already established procedures based on their schooling and expect to become head chef within a year. Their most recent Google searches include “pâte à choux ratio” and “student load forgiveness.”

Favorite things to cook: Chicken with fines herbes, consommé, and tourné potatoes.

Favorite sayings:

“In culinary school I was taught that you should peel tomatoes before adding them to a sauce.”

“I’ve been working here for three months and haven’t been promoted to sous chef yet. This is bullshit!”

4. The One Who’s Always in Between Jobs:

How to spot one: Year after year these cooks tell their coworkers that working in a kitchen is a temporary gig for them (something they are doing just to hold them over until they get a "real" job). Fast-forward 10 years later, and they are still working the grill station and telling others that the job is a joke.Favorite thing to cook: The same dish they have cooked over and over again for the past 10 years.Favorite sayings: "This is just a temporary job to hold me over until I get a real one.""I'm not really a cook."

Charlotte Gomez / BuzzFeed

How to spot one: Year after year these cooks tell their coworkers that working in a kitchen is a temporary gig for them (something they are doing just to hold them over until they get a “real” job). Fast-forward 10 years later, and they are still working the grill station and telling others that the job is a joke.

Favorite thing to cook: The same dish they have cooked over and over again for the past 10 years.

Favorite sayings:

“This is just a temporary job to hold me over until I get a real one.”

“I’m not really a cook.”

5. The Preacher:

How to spot one: Similar to the kitchen bro, these individuals can be found lecturing other employees on best practices. Making a hollandaise? They have a better way of doing it. Washing a dirty pan? They have a better way of doing it. Taking the garbage out? They also have a better way of doing it.Favorite thing to cook: Whatever you're cooking (because lucky for you, they're an expert at it).Favorite sayings: "I have a trick for that!""Let me show you the proper way to peel a potato."

Charlotte Gomez / BuzzFeed

How to spot one: Similar to the kitchen bro, these individuals can be found lecturing other employees on best practices. Making a hollandaise? They have a better way of doing it. Washing a dirty pan? They have a better way of doing it. Taking the garbage out? They alsohave a better way of doing it.

Favorite thing to cook: Whatever you’re cooking (because lucky for you, they’re an expert at it).

Favorite sayings:

“I have a trick for that!”

“Let me show you the proper way to peel a potato.”

6. The Corporate Chef:

How to spot one: This worker clocks in at 9 and out at 5. They have multiple colors of cutting boards for different applications (meat on red, fish on blue, NO exceptions), and their most-used piece of equipment is the microwave. Fine-dining bros would call them sellouts (although most of them are actually just fine-dining bros who've settled down). You can find them at airports, hotels, and 25-year reunions of their culinary school programs. (Oh, the good old days!)Favorite things to cook: Duchess potatoes using instant mashed potatoes and their signature chocolate lava cake (made with Sysco chocolate cake mix) topped with whipped cream, a raspberry, and a mint leaf.Favorite sayings: "When I was a chef in New York City I would work eight days a week!""Just pop it in the microwave.""I have 10 days of paid vacation I have to take."

Charlotte Gomez / BuzzFeed

How to spot one: This worker clocks in at 9 and out at 5. They have multiple colors of cutting boards for different applications (meat on red, fish on blue, NO exceptions), and their most-used piece of equipment is the microwave. Fine-dining bros would call them sellouts (although most of them are actually just fine-dining bros who’ve settled down). You can find them at airports, hotels, and 25-year reunions of their culinary school programs. (Oh, the good old days!)

Favorite things to cook: Duchess potatoes using instant mashed potatoes and their signature chocolate lava cake (made with Sysco chocolate cake mix) topped with whipped cream, a raspberry, and a mint leaf.

Favorite sayings:

“When I was a chef in New York City I would work eight days a week!”

“Just pop it in the microwave.”

“I have 10 days of paid vacation I have to take.”

7. The Alchemist:

How to spot one: These individuals are obsessed with the not-so-new trend of molecular gastronomy and force it upon every restaurant they work at. They carry around a mini scale (usually used to measure ~other~ expensive substances) and other odd tools.Favorite thing to cook: Deconstructed s'mores with marshmallow fluid gel, spherificated chocolate sauce, graham cracker foam, and campfire essence.Favorite sayings:"It's the idea of chicken Parmesan.""What if we turned it into a foam?""Does anyone have an aquarium pump I can borrow?"

Charlotte Gomez / BuzzFeed

How to spot one: These individuals are obsessed with the not-so-new trend of molecular gastronomy and force it upon every restaurant they work at. They carry around a mini scale (usually used to measure ~other~ expensive substances) and other odd tools.

Favorite thing to cook: Deconstructed s’mores with marshmallow fluid gel, spherificated chocolate sauce, graham cracker foam, and campfire essence.

Favorite sayings:

“It’s the idea of chicken Parmesan.”

“What if we turned it into a foam?”

“Does anyone have an aquarium pump I can borrow?”

8. The Chef de Partayyy:

How to spot one: These individuals are not necessarily actual chefs de parties, but they certainly know how to party. They arrive hungover from the night before fueled with adrenaline and survive the rush of service like a pro. Their go-to accessories are a quart container filled with water and kitchen Crocs paired with jeans and a button-down.Favorite thing to cook: The last ticket of the night (that way they can quickly cover their whole station in a single layer of plastic wrap and run).Favorite sayings: "Anyone up for a shift drink?""It's industry night at The Bourgeois Pig."

Charlotte Gomez / BuzzFeed

How to spot one: These individuals are not necessarily actual chefs de parties, but they certainly know how to party. They arrive hungover from the night before fueled with adrenaline and survive the rush of service like a pro. Their go-to accessories are a quart container filled with water and kitchen Crocs paired with jeans and a button-down.

Favorite thing to cook: The last ticket of the night (that way they can quickly cover their whole station in a single layer of plastic wrap and run).

Favorite sayings:

“Anyone up for a shift drink?”

“It’s industry night at The Bourgeois Pig.”

9. The Martyr:

How to spot one: These cooks have never taken a break, pick up extra shifts, and constantly complain about how hard working in a kitchen is (and to be fair, they are working pretty damn hard). They are resentful toward the front-of-house staff for having "plushy" jobs but would never sell out and become a corporate chef.Favorite thing to cook: Whatever you want them to cook.Favorite saying: "Anything for you, chef."
Charlotte Gomez / BuzzFeed

How to spot one: These cooks have never taken a break, pick up extra shifts, and constantly complain about how hard working in a kitchen is (and to be fair, they are working pretty damn hard). They are resentful toward the front-of-house staff for having “plushy” jobs but would never sell out and become a corporate chef.

Favorite thing to cook: Whatever you want them to cook.

Favorite saying:

“Anything for you, chef.”

 

Article originally published on: https://www.buzzfeed.com/

Head Chef Salary

A Head Chef earns an average salary of R146,783 per year. A skill in Menu Planning is associated with high pay for this job. Most people move on to other jobs if they have more than 20 years’ experience in this career.

 

Job Description for Head Chef

Head chefs work in restaurants, cafeterias, catering companies, bakeries, and many other other places which serve food. These chefs are generally expected to specialize in the particular cuisines served by their employers in order to prepare and cook food, often with the help of other chefs, and present it in an attractive manner. In some positions, head chefs may also be responsible for creating and modifying the menu or setting prices for selections.

Some employers prefer that their head chefs have completed culinary education, though this is not a strict requirement, as other employers prioritize the actual ability to cook food. Head chefs may also have inventory and purchasing duties and work within budgets, so it is important to be able to maintain the best-quality food while staying within them. Managing employees and ensuring that they are working efficiently is also a common part of the job.

Prior to being hired, head chefs should have a health safety certification, and many years of prior experience may be necessary to reach this position. Working hours vary greatly, as these chefs may have to work longer hours when the business is busy, and many jobs require working nights or weekends as such. (Copyright 2018 PayScale.com)


Head Chef Tasks

  • Manage kitchen operation including food purchases and preparation, record keeping, quality standards, and sanitation.
  • Train employees in cooking methods, plate presentations, portions, and cost control.

 

Pay by Experience Level for Head Chef

Payscale Graph

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pay by Experience for a Head Chef has a positive trend. An entry-level Head Chef with less than 5 years of experience can expect to earn an average total compensation of R106,000 based on 67 salaries provided by anonymous users. Average total compensation includes tips, bonus, and overtime pay. A Head Chef with mid-career experience which includes employees with 5 to 10 years of experience can expect to earn an average total compensation of R146,000 based on 56 salaries. An experienced Head Chef which includes employees with 10 to 20 years of experience can expect to earn an average total compensation of R186,000 based on 61 salaries. A Head Chef with late-career experience which includes employees with greater than 20 years of experience can expect to earn an average total compensation of R182,000 based on 14 salaries.

, , ,

A Visit from CTHs’ Academic Director, Angela Hagenow

The Trip

 

dinner CTH

CTHs’ Academic Director, Angela Hagenow, received a warm welcome from the ITHSA team in the Cape Town offices South Africa. During a two-day workshop, which was facilitated by Angela, the ITHSA team felt empowered with CTH knowledge which Angela shared. The outcomes of the inter-active workshop conducted at the ITHSA offices with the ITHSA team and Angela proved to be a valuable experience for CTH and ITHSA in terms of key suggestions to the alignment of current ITHSA work processes to CTH processes and policies.

 

 

 

Angela’s extensive knowledge of the Culinary Skills Programme, is greatly appreciated as she left the ITHSA team feeling confident in our product knowledge in the Culinary Skills space. After two days extensive product, process, and policy knowledge empowering at the ITHSA offices in Cape Town, it was time to hit the road to visit our training providers in Johannesburg.

 

 

ITHSA PROVIDER VISITS

CTH visit 2The CTH Academic Director, Angela Hagenow, accompanied by ITHSA Business Development Consultant, Lesley Ann Kriel, conducted various ITHSA provider site and courtesy visits during our two days stay in Johannesburg.

 

Included on this list of provider visits, was the newly accredited ITHSA centre, Prestige College. We also had the privilege of being in the company of our new provider while we introduced Angela to a South African steak for dinner. Joined by ICB business consultant in Johannesburg, Mandisa Gumede, the evening was spent engaging in business discussion topics of which valuable points were raised in terms of implementing marketing strategies for the ITHSA programme offerings in South African schools. After much chatter, dinner was eventually served, and it was time to relax and enjoy the meal.

 

On day two, Angela, myself and Mandisa conducted a site visit at the international Hotel School, in Sandton, Johannesburg, where the friendly front desk consultant greeted us. Thereafter, we were given a tour of the Kitchens, which proved to be of high quality. Chef Candice Adams, head chef facilitator of the JHB campus engaged in a key discussion regarding the Culinary Skills and Arts programmes. Prior to our visit, a skype call meeting was arranged with the College Dean, Jolanda Bierman, to meet Angela and briefly discuss academic related topics. Angela shared her knowledge and experience during our meeting and was dearly thanked by the Dean, for selecting the International Hotel School to be one of her site visits.

 

cth visit 5Our next provider, welcomed us with chocolate and velvet cupcakes and tea which we enjoyed thoroughly. The ladies from the CTU Training Solutions, were thrilled to have us there and once again, showed their appreciation with the inter-active discussions which took place that afternoon.

 

Angela certainly left our ITHSA providers feeling motivated and positive. I anticipate that our new business figures for ITHSA will increase significantly next year.

With the industry knowledge and the CTH experiences that Angela shared with us, it assures me that we are on the road to success.

 

 

Gordon Behind Bars

Ramsay’s TV series, Gordon Behind Bars, sees the celebrity chef heading into the heart of the British penal system teaching inmates some real culinary skills. The celebrity chef spoke about his experiences teaching inmates at HMP Brixton how to cook.

“The idea came from the fact that there are approximately 80,000 inmates across the country now, which is a hell of a lot,” explains Ramsay. “It was about getting them doing something with their time, giving something back, and also getting job-ready.”

Indeed, this idea of giving prisoners a sense of purpose underpins the whole series, and was partly inspired by the relative laxity of prison life that Ramsay observed during filming.

“What struck me most was the waste of time, effort and energy that could be channelled into something incredibly positive. “They have lost their will to work, and had all responsibility taken away from them. For me, it’s such a waste, such a missed opportunity. They’re just using the system, they’re not motivated to do anything. They’ve got everything they need. If they were given more incentives to do some work, to get job-ready, to be disciplined, it would help them, and surely their time would also go faster.”

And so Gordon’s scheme, which involved setting up a bakery inside HMP Brixton, was born. However, to begin with it wasn’t easy to motivate the inmates to work, as the short-tempered chef explains: “Getting them out of bed in the morning was tough,” he says. “They don’t have to be up. Most of them get locked up after dinner, at 5:15pm, and they’re not let out the next day until the morning. So gathering them around was just horrendous.”

And even when he did manage to assemble a kitchen-load of offenders, the rules of the system made the business of teaching cookery a rather trying experience. “If someone wanted a knife or a peeler or a spatula or a plastic scraper, you’d have to go to the shadow board on the wall, take out what you wanted, sign for it, give them a number, and then they weren’t allowed more than two utensils out at any one time,” Ramsay remembers.

But for all the setbacks, Gordon’s scheme to get prisoners motivated and productive ultimately proved successful, with the inmates eventually growing appreciative of the chance to work.

“Some of them had tears in their eyes when they got their certificates at the end”. And CTH was present throughout the programme. Gordon was fronting the project however to gain permission to film in the prison sector he had to find an awarding organisation that would be willing to work with him to ensure that the participants in the programme had something to show for what they contributed. This was how the CTH Level 2 Award in Culinary Skills was born. Because of Gordon’s previous involvement with CTH and Tante Marie Culinary Academy he came to us first and together we identified the content, delivery and assessment methods.

Gordon’s final thoughts – “At the end it was like having a team of chefs. I almost forgot they were prisoners. In their minds now, they are ready and hungry to get out with real and realistic ambitions. They go back to the cell tired at the end of the day, they sleep well, and their sentence goes a thousand times faster.”

BACKGROUND:

Gordon Behind Bars is a British television series in which Gordon Ramsay teaches inmates of Brixton prison, London, how to cook. It was broadcast in four episodes from 26 June – 17 July 2012 on Channel 4. Ramsay, a Michelin Star Chef in the UK, enters Brixton prison over a six-month period (December 2011 to June 2012) with the goal of teaching inmates how to cook and run a sustainable business selling goods prepared inside the prison to the general public.

Bad Boys’ Bakery

After some training from Ramsay, the inmate chefs of Brixton prison formed a business dubbed “Bad Boys’ Bakery”, under the slogan “Life Changing Taste”, selling a Ramsay version of a lemon treacle slice. Ramsay was able to negotiate an agreement for a trial order of 100 bars (per cafe) to be sold in 11 Caffè Nero locations across South London.

Potential Salary as a Head Chef

A Head Chef earns an average salary of R145,803 per year. A skill in Menu Planning is associated with high pay for this job. Most people move on to other jobs if they have more than 20 years’ experience in this career.