The 9 Types Of Cooks Who Work In Fine Dining Restaurants

Every restaurant has at least one of them.

1. The Fine-Dining Bro:

How to spot one: These cooks are covered in tattoos of cleavers, whisks, and pork cuts, carry a pair of plating tweezers on them at all times, and prefer small plates to large portions. They are most commonly found in gastropubs, fine-dining restaurants, pop-up events, and farm-to-table institutions, and they have the biggest ego in the kitchen.Favorite thing to cook: Anything sous vide (have they mentioned they're the best at using a Cryovac machine? Here, let them show you!), Asian fusion, molecular gastronomy, tapas (with a modern twist), and anything that has a spoon drag or quenelle on the plate.Favorite sayings: "Make it soigné.""When you work with the best ingredients, everything you add to them is just taking away from their natural beauty.""Blank space on a plate gives the food room to breathe."

Charlotte Gomez / BuzzFeed

How to spot one: These cooks are covered in tattoos of cleavers, whisks, and pork cuts, carry a pair of plating tweezers on them at all times, and prefer small plates to large portions. They are most commonly found in gastropubs, fine-dining restaurants, pop-up events, and farm-to-table institutions, and they have the biggest ego in the kitchen.

Favorite thing to cook: Anything sous vide (have they mentioned they’re the best at using a Cryovac machine? Here, let them show you!), Asian fusion, molecular gastronomy, tapas (with a modern twist), and anything that has a spoon drag or quenelle on the plate.

Favorite sayings:

“Make it soigné.”

“When you work with the best ingredients, everything you add to them is just taking away from their natural beauty.”

“Blank space on a plate gives the food room to breathe.”

2. The Drill Sergeant:

How to spot one: Also called yellers, these individuals are your classic manage-by-fear chefs. They continue the outdated practice of running a hostile kitchen and believe the best way to improve their team is to "break them down to build them up." This personality type remains popular due to the portrayal of chefs on reality TV and movies. They also love to throw shit and make their point heard.Favorite thing to cook: Vegetable stock made from the onion scraps you got caught trying to throw away (to teach you a lesson on food waste).Favorite sayings: "If you have time to lean, you have time to clean!"“This is the way I was trained, and this is the way you will be trained.""Culinary students have no work ethic these days!"

Charlotte Gomez / BuzzFeed

How to spot one: Also called yellers, these individuals are your classic manage-by-fear chefs. They continue the outdated practice of running a hostile kitchen and believe the best way to improve their team is to “break them down to build them up.” This personality type remains popular due to the portrayal of chefs on reality TV and movies. They also love to throw shit and make their point heard.

Favorite thing to cook: Vegetable stock made from the onion scraps you got caught trying to throw away (to teach you a lesson on food waste).

Favorite sayings:

“If you have time to lean, you have time to clean!”

“This is the way I was trained, and this is the way you will be trained.”

“Culinary students have no work ethic these days!”

3. The Recent Culinary School Grad:

How to spot one: These cooks arrive 20 minutes early wearing checkered pants, an ironed coat, and a toque. They suggest alternative methods to already established procedures based on their schooling and expect to become head chef within a year. Their most recent Google searches include "pâte à choux ratio" and "student load forgiveness."Favorite things to cook: Chicken with fines herbes, consommé, and tourné potatoes.Favorite sayings: "In culinary school I was taught that you should peel tomatoes before adding them to a sauce.""I've been working here for three months and haven't been promoted to sous chef yet. This is bullshit!"

Charlotte Gomez / BuzzFeed

How to spot one: These cooks arrive 20 minutes early wearing checkered pants, an ironed coat, and a toque. They suggest alternative methods to already established procedures based on their schooling and expect to become head chef within a year. Their most recent Google searches include “pâte à choux ratio” and “student load forgiveness.”

Favorite things to cook: Chicken with fines herbes, consommé, and tourné potatoes.

Favorite sayings:

“In culinary school I was taught that you should peel tomatoes before adding them to a sauce.”

“I’ve been working here for three months and haven’t been promoted to sous chef yet. This is bullshit!”

4. The One Who’s Always in Between Jobs:

How to spot one: Year after year these cooks tell their coworkers that working in a kitchen is a temporary gig for them (something they are doing just to hold them over until they get a "real" job). Fast-forward 10 years later, and they are still working the grill station and telling others that the job is a joke.Favorite thing to cook: The same dish they have cooked over and over again for the past 10 years.Favorite sayings: "This is just a temporary job to hold me over until I get a real one.""I'm not really a cook."

Charlotte Gomez / BuzzFeed

How to spot one: Year after year these cooks tell their coworkers that working in a kitchen is a temporary gig for them (something they are doing just to hold them over until they get a “real” job). Fast-forward 10 years later, and they are still working the grill station and telling others that the job is a joke.

Favorite thing to cook: The same dish they have cooked over and over again for the past 10 years.

Favorite sayings:

“This is just a temporary job to hold me over until I get a real one.”

“I’m not really a cook.”

5. The Preacher:

How to spot one: Similar to the kitchen bro, these individuals can be found lecturing other employees on best practices. Making a hollandaise? They have a better way of doing it. Washing a dirty pan? They have a better way of doing it. Taking the garbage out? They also have a better way of doing it.Favorite thing to cook: Whatever you're cooking (because lucky for you, they're an expert at it).Favorite sayings: "I have a trick for that!""Let me show you the proper way to peel a potato."

Charlotte Gomez / BuzzFeed

How to spot one: Similar to the kitchen bro, these individuals can be found lecturing other employees on best practices. Making a hollandaise? They have a better way of doing it. Washing a dirty pan? They have a better way of doing it. Taking the garbage out? They alsohave a better way of doing it.

Favorite thing to cook: Whatever you’re cooking (because lucky for you, they’re an expert at it).

Favorite sayings:

“I have a trick for that!”

“Let me show you the proper way to peel a potato.”

6. The Corporate Chef:

How to spot one: This worker clocks in at 9 and out at 5. They have multiple colors of cutting boards for different applications (meat on red, fish on blue, NO exceptions), and their most-used piece of equipment is the microwave. Fine-dining bros would call them sellouts (although most of them are actually just fine-dining bros who've settled down). You can find them at airports, hotels, and 25-year reunions of their culinary school programs. (Oh, the good old days!)Favorite things to cook: Duchess potatoes using instant mashed potatoes and their signature chocolate lava cake (made with Sysco chocolate cake mix) topped with whipped cream, a raspberry, and a mint leaf.Favorite sayings: "When I was a chef in New York City I would work eight days a week!""Just pop it in the microwave.""I have 10 days of paid vacation I have to take."

Charlotte Gomez / BuzzFeed

How to spot one: This worker clocks in at 9 and out at 5. They have multiple colors of cutting boards for different applications (meat on red, fish on blue, NO exceptions), and their most-used piece of equipment is the microwave. Fine-dining bros would call them sellouts (although most of them are actually just fine-dining bros who’ve settled down). You can find them at airports, hotels, and 25-year reunions of their culinary school programs. (Oh, the good old days!)

Favorite things to cook: Duchess potatoes using instant mashed potatoes and their signature chocolate lava cake (made with Sysco chocolate cake mix) topped with whipped cream, a raspberry, and a mint leaf.

Favorite sayings:

“When I was a chef in New York City I would work eight days a week!”

“Just pop it in the microwave.”

“I have 10 days of paid vacation I have to take.”

7. The Alchemist:

How to spot one: These individuals are obsessed with the not-so-new trend of molecular gastronomy and force it upon every restaurant they work at. They carry around a mini scale (usually used to measure ~other~ expensive substances) and other odd tools.Favorite thing to cook: Deconstructed s'mores with marshmallow fluid gel, spherificated chocolate sauce, graham cracker foam, and campfire essence.Favorite sayings:"It's the idea of chicken Parmesan.""What if we turned it into a foam?""Does anyone have an aquarium pump I can borrow?"

Charlotte Gomez / BuzzFeed

How to spot one: These individuals are obsessed with the not-so-new trend of molecular gastronomy and force it upon every restaurant they work at. They carry around a mini scale (usually used to measure ~other~ expensive substances) and other odd tools.

Favorite thing to cook: Deconstructed s’mores with marshmallow fluid gel, spherificated chocolate sauce, graham cracker foam, and campfire essence.

Favorite sayings:

“It’s the idea of chicken Parmesan.”

“What if we turned it into a foam?”

“Does anyone have an aquarium pump I can borrow?”

8. The Chef de Partayyy:

How to spot one: These individuals are not necessarily actual chefs de parties, but they certainly know how to party. They arrive hungover from the night before fueled with adrenaline and survive the rush of service like a pro. Their go-to accessories are a quart container filled with water and kitchen Crocs paired with jeans and a button-down.Favorite thing to cook: The last ticket of the night (that way they can quickly cover their whole station in a single layer of plastic wrap and run).Favorite sayings: "Anyone up for a shift drink?""It's industry night at The Bourgeois Pig."

Charlotte Gomez / BuzzFeed

How to spot one: These individuals are not necessarily actual chefs de parties, but they certainly know how to party. They arrive hungover from the night before fueled with adrenaline and survive the rush of service like a pro. Their go-to accessories are a quart container filled with water and kitchen Crocs paired with jeans and a button-down.

Favorite thing to cook: The last ticket of the night (that way they can quickly cover their whole station in a single layer of plastic wrap and run).

Favorite sayings:

“Anyone up for a shift drink?”

“It’s industry night at The Bourgeois Pig.”

9. The Martyr:

How to spot one: These cooks have never taken a break, pick up extra shifts, and constantly complain about how hard working in a kitchen is (and to be fair, they are working pretty damn hard). They are resentful toward the front-of-house staff for having "plushy" jobs but would never sell out and become a corporate chef.Favorite thing to cook: Whatever you want them to cook.Favorite saying: "Anything for you, chef."
Charlotte Gomez / BuzzFeed

How to spot one: These cooks have never taken a break, pick up extra shifts, and constantly complain about how hard working in a kitchen is (and to be fair, they are working pretty damn hard). They are resentful toward the front-of-house staff for having “plushy” jobs but would never sell out and become a corporate chef.

Favorite thing to cook: Whatever you want them to cook.

Favorite saying:

“Anything for you, chef.”

 

Article originally published on: https://www.buzzfeed.com/

Head Chef Salary

A Head Chef earns an average salary of R146,783 per year. A skill in Menu Planning is associated with high pay for this job. Most people move on to other jobs if they have more than 20 years’ experience in this career.

 

Job Description for Head Chef

Head chefs work in restaurants, cafeterias, catering companies, bakeries, and many other other places which serve food. These chefs are generally expected to specialize in the particular cuisines served by their employers in order to prepare and cook food, often with the help of other chefs, and present it in an attractive manner. In some positions, head chefs may also be responsible for creating and modifying the menu or setting prices for selections.

Some employers prefer that their head chefs have completed culinary education, though this is not a strict requirement, as other employers prioritize the actual ability to cook food. Head chefs may also have inventory and purchasing duties and work within budgets, so it is important to be able to maintain the best-quality food while staying within them. Managing employees and ensuring that they are working efficiently is also a common part of the job.

Prior to being hired, head chefs should have a health safety certification, and many years of prior experience may be necessary to reach this position. Working hours vary greatly, as these chefs may have to work longer hours when the business is busy, and many jobs require working nights or weekends as such. (Copyright 2018 PayScale.com)


Head Chef Tasks

  • Manage kitchen operation including food purchases and preparation, record keeping, quality standards, and sanitation.
  • Train employees in cooking methods, plate presentations, portions, and cost control.

 

Pay by Experience Level for Head Chef

Payscale Graph

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pay by Experience for a Head Chef has a positive trend. An entry-level Head Chef with less than 5 years of experience can expect to earn an average total compensation of R106,000 based on 67 salaries provided by anonymous users. Average total compensation includes tips, bonus, and overtime pay. A Head Chef with mid-career experience which includes employees with 5 to 10 years of experience can expect to earn an average total compensation of R146,000 based on 56 salaries. An experienced Head Chef which includes employees with 10 to 20 years of experience can expect to earn an average total compensation of R186,000 based on 61 salaries. A Head Chef with late-career experience which includes employees with greater than 20 years of experience can expect to earn an average total compensation of R182,000 based on 14 salaries.

, , ,

A Visit from CTHs’ Academic Director, Angela Hagenow

The Trip

 

dinner CTH

CTHs’ Academic Director, Angela Hagenow, received a warm welcome from the ITHSA team in the Cape Town offices South Africa. During a two-day workshop, which was facilitated by Angela, the ITHSA team felt empowered with CTH knowledge which Angela shared. The outcomes of the inter-active workshop conducted at the ITHSA offices with the ITHSA team and Angela proved to be a valuable experience for CTH and ITHSA in terms of key suggestions to the alignment of current ITHSA work processes to CTH processes and policies.

 

 

 

Angela’s extensive knowledge of the Culinary Skills Programme, is greatly appreciated as she left the ITHSA team feeling confident in our product knowledge in the Culinary Skills space. After two days extensive product, process, and policy knowledge empowering at the ITHSA offices in Cape Town, it was time to hit the road to visit our training providers in Johannesburg.

 

 

ITHSA PROVIDER VISITS

CTH visit 2The CTH Academic Director, Angela Hagenow, accompanied by ITHSA Business Development Consultant, Lesley Ann Kriel, conducted various ITHSA provider site and courtesy visits during our two days stay in Johannesburg.

 

Included on this list of provider visits, was the newly accredited ITHSA centre, Prestige College. We also had the privilege of being in the company of our new provider while we introduced Angela to a South African steak for dinner. Joined by ICB business consultant in Johannesburg, Mandisa Gumede, the evening was spent engaging in business discussion topics of which valuable points were raised in terms of implementing marketing strategies for the ITHSA programme offerings in South African schools. After much chatter, dinner was eventually served, and it was time to relax and enjoy the meal.

 

On day two, Angela, myself and Mandisa conducted a site visit at the international Hotel School, in Sandton, Johannesburg, where the friendly front desk consultant greeted us. Thereafter, we were given a tour of the Kitchens, which proved to be of high quality. Chef Candice Adams, head chef facilitator of the JHB campus engaged in a key discussion regarding the Culinary Skills and Arts programmes. Prior to our visit, a skype call meeting was arranged with the College Dean, Jolanda Bierman, to meet Angela and briefly discuss academic related topics. Angela shared her knowledge and experience during our meeting and was dearly thanked by the Dean, for selecting the International Hotel School to be one of her site visits.

 

cth visit 5Our next provider, welcomed us with chocolate and velvet cupcakes and tea which we enjoyed thoroughly. The ladies from the CTU Training Solutions, were thrilled to have us there and once again, showed their appreciation with the inter-active discussions which took place that afternoon.

 

Angela certainly left our ITHSA providers feeling motivated and positive. I anticipate that our new business figures for ITHSA will increase significantly next year.

With the industry knowledge and the CTH experiences that Angela shared with us, it assures me that we are on the road to success.

 

 

Gordon Behind Bars

Ramsay’s TV series, Gordon Behind Bars, sees the celebrity chef heading into the heart of the British penal system teaching inmates some real culinary skills. The celebrity chef spoke about his experiences teaching inmates at HMP Brixton how to cook.

“The idea came from the fact that there are approximately 80,000 inmates across the country now, which is a hell of a lot,” explains Ramsay. “It was about getting them doing something with their time, giving something back, and also getting job-ready.”

Indeed, this idea of giving prisoners a sense of purpose underpins the whole series, and was partly inspired by the relative laxity of prison life that Ramsay observed during filming.

“What struck me most was the waste of time, effort and energy that could be channelled into something incredibly positive. “They have lost their will to work, and had all responsibility taken away from them. For me, it’s such a waste, such a missed opportunity. They’re just using the system, they’re not motivated to do anything. They’ve got everything they need. If they were given more incentives to do some work, to get job-ready, to be disciplined, it would help them, and surely their time would also go faster.”

And so Gordon’s scheme, which involved setting up a bakery inside HMP Brixton, was born. However, to begin with it wasn’t easy to motivate the inmates to work, as the short-tempered chef explains: “Getting them out of bed in the morning was tough,” he says. “They don’t have to be up. Most of them get locked up after dinner, at 5:15pm, and they’re not let out the next day until the morning. So gathering them around was just horrendous.”

And even when he did manage to assemble a kitchen-load of offenders, the rules of the system made the business of teaching cookery a rather trying experience. “If someone wanted a knife or a peeler or a spatula or a plastic scraper, you’d have to go to the shadow board on the wall, take out what you wanted, sign for it, give them a number, and then they weren’t allowed more than two utensils out at any one time,” Ramsay remembers.

But for all the setbacks, Gordon’s scheme to get prisoners motivated and productive ultimately proved successful, with the inmates eventually growing appreciative of the chance to work.

“Some of them had tears in their eyes when they got their certificates at the end”. And CTH was present throughout the programme. Gordon was fronting the project however to gain permission to film in the prison sector he had to find an awarding organisation that would be willing to work with him to ensure that the participants in the programme had something to show for what they contributed. This was how the CTH Level 2 Award in Culinary Skills was born. Because of Gordon’s previous involvement with CTH and Tante Marie Culinary Academy he came to us first and together we identified the content, delivery and assessment methods.

Gordon’s final thoughts – “At the end it was like having a team of chefs. I almost forgot they were prisoners. In their minds now, they are ready and hungry to get out with real and realistic ambitions. They go back to the cell tired at the end of the day, they sleep well, and their sentence goes a thousand times faster.”

BACKGROUND:

Gordon Behind Bars is a British television series in which Gordon Ramsay teaches inmates of Brixton prison, London, how to cook. It was broadcast in four episodes from 26 June – 17 July 2012 on Channel 4. Ramsay, a Michelin Star Chef in the UK, enters Brixton prison over a six-month period (December 2011 to June 2012) with the goal of teaching inmates how to cook and run a sustainable business selling goods prepared inside the prison to the general public.

Bad Boys’ Bakery

After some training from Ramsay, the inmate chefs of Brixton prison formed a business dubbed “Bad Boys’ Bakery”, under the slogan “Life Changing Taste”, selling a Ramsay version of a lemon treacle slice. Ramsay was able to negotiate an agreement for a trial order of 100 bars (per cafe) to be sold in 11 Caffè Nero locations across South London.

Potential Salary as a Head Chef

CTH Connections Newsletter – September 2017
CTH Connections Newsletter – September 2017
Posted on 27th September, 2017
CTH CONNECTIONS NEWSLETTER WEBSITE

SHOULD LAPTOPS AND IPADS BE USED FOR EXAMS?

article 1 2article 1 1

Typically, exams come under two categories; written and practical. Practical exams can vary depending on the subject, but written exams are fairly straightforward. In written exams, you get a paper, a pen, and occasionally you might get a calculator or a text book. But, what if I was to tell you that instead of having all these things in your exam, all you needed was a laptop or tablet. This probably doesn’t sound realistic, however, the world renowned, Cambridge University have recently piloted exams based on typing rather than handwriting.

It may seem a bold move by Cambridge but just think about how technology has changed our lifestyles. Hearing about how teenagers are always on their phones and laptops can get tiresome, but we don’t write by hand as much as we used to. This is especially true once you start working. Taking all that into account, this may not be such a bold move by Cambridge but instead they are simply adjusting to the times. Cambridge argues that technology has deteriorated the art of handwriting. They go further to claim that handwriting issues amongst their students is so bad that it is costing them marks due to it be illegibility. Based on that, it is reasonable to some to respond in the way that they have, however, the proposed method they have chosen still raises many questions.

Questions in regards to the procedures involved in digitising exams need to be addressed. For example, who will supply the laptops? If students can use their own laptops, how will the university determine what’s on the laptop. Surely, using laptops and tablets make it easier to cheat during exams. Another question is in regards to auto-correct. The majority of our laptops and tablets have a spell checker system whereby it can correct misspelled words, should we allow such a system in exams? Some would argue that we are over accommodating students. Commenting on the Cambridge news, one parent sarcastically said ‘Next up: why students with a lower typing speed should be given more time to complete their exams.’ Whether we should persevere with written exams or move on to digital is debatble and one that wont be immediate, however, it is something that should be considered.

The education system is an old institution that’s usually slower than the rest of society to respond to changes. However, Cambridge University being as influential as it is, may be able to set a trend towards digitising exams. If the tests being conducted by Cambridge prove to be a success, it’s interesting to see what impact it will have not just in the UK but worldwide. Cambridge is an influential institution, so they could be setting a blueprint for the future.

THE FUTURE TECH IN THE TRAVEL INDUSTRY

PROVIDED BY YUMMY LOVE JOURNEY

bigstock–194668567

Technological advancement has been moving at extraordinary speeds over the last couple of decades. New industries have emerged and existing ones are changing. In the travel industry, it was seen as a backward step in technology when the ever-speedy Concorde retired and came out of service. However, the industry is now back at the forefront of technology and embracing how we book and travel. Below are some of the trends shaping the industry.

1. Travelbots

A Travelbot or Chatbot allows travellers to book their travel through a messaging platform such as Facebook Messenger. You can enter your destination, number of nights and dates and the bot will make recommendations allowing you to continue with the booking. Expedia.com is launching on Skype and allows you to search for hotels, book, manage, cancel and confirm reservations. If you have a question the bot can’t answer then you can call Expedia directly free of charge. The bots are powered by Artificial Intelligence (AI) and conversational computing. It allows Travel Agents and Travel Management Companies to engage with the customer earlier on in the booking process. The new generation who have been raised with iPhones and Androids are comfortable not engaging with a person and require simple and intelligent software to allow them to go with a self-service option and book all aspects of their travels independently.

2. Virtual Reality (VR) and Augmented Reality (AR)

VR has already been introduced by airlines to show the various cabins on offer and upgrade passengers into Premium, Business and First class. Qatar, who have just introduced the world’s first double bed use VR to allow passengers to experience the space and new product. Hotels can also use VR to give a full 360-degree immersive experience into the hotel and its rooms. Cruise companies are using VR and AR to sell the variety of ships and cruises on offer, allowing customers to again experience what it would be like to be on the actual ship.

3. Voice interfaces (VI)

A report by Phocuswright suggests that millennials travel more than any other group of travellers. We have already seen how speech recognition in the form of Amazon’s Alexa allows users to access information with ease. The future of VI in the travel industry will allow travellers to seamlessly make requests and bookings through voice recognition whilst also recognising your personal preferences and making suggestions appropriate to your needs.

4. Wearable devices

The introduction of the smartwatch allowed customers to board planes and unlock hotel rooms. This area will continue to grow and provide a more personalised service. In November this year Carnival Cruises will launch a Medallion Class on Princess Cruise Lines which will allow the customer (whilst wearing the medallion) to enable keyless access room entry, personalised concierge service and wallet free payments as well as acting as a social tool to let customers connect after their trip.

By Ulpa Chauhan
Yummy Love Journey

CULINARY APPRENTICESHIPS: A GIFT AND A CURSE

bigstock-Team-of-chefs-preparing-food-i-135995933bigstock-Teacher-Helping-Students-Train-92727146

Bridging the gap between the working world and the education system can be a difficult task, especially for someone who only has a vague idea of what they want to do.

Culinary Apprenticeships: A Gift and a Curse

CTH Connections Newsletter – September 2017
CTH Connections Newsletter – September 2017
Posted on 27th September, 2017
CTH CONNECTIONS NEWSLETTER WEBSITE

SHOULD LAPTOPS AND IPADS BE USED FOR EXAMS?

article 1 2article 1 1

Typically, exams come under two categories; written and practical. Practical exams can vary depending on the subject, but written exams are fairly straightforward. In written exams, you get a paper, a pen, and occasionally you might get a calculator or a text book. But, what if I was to tell you that instead of having all these things in your exam, all you needed was a laptop or tablet. This probably doesn’t sound realistic, however, the world renowned, Cambridge University have recently piloted exams based on typing rather than handwriting.

It may seem a bold move by Cambridge but just think about how technology has changed our lifestyles. Hearing about how teenagers are always on their phones and laptops can get tiresome, but we don’t write by hand as much as we used to. This is especially true once you start working. Taking all that into account, this may not be such a bold move by Cambridge but instead they are simply adjusting to the times. Cambridge argues that technology has deteriorated the art of handwriting. They go further to claim that handwriting issues amongst their students is so bad that it is costing them marks due to it be illegibility. Based on that, it is reasonable to some to respond in the way that they have, however, the proposed method they have chosen still raises many questions.

Questions in regards to the procedures involved in digitising exams need to be addressed. For example, who will supply the laptops? If students can use their own laptops, how will the university determine what’s on the laptop. Surely, using laptops and tablets make it easier to cheat during exams. Another question is in regards to auto-correct. The majority of our laptops and tablets have a spell checker system whereby it can correct misspelled words, should we allow such a system in exams? Some would argue that we are over accommodating students. Commenting on the Cambridge news, one parent sarcastically said ‘Next up: why students with a lower typing speed should be given more time to complete their exams.’ Whether we should persevere with written exams or move on to digital is debatble and one that wont be immediate, however, it is something that should be considered.

The education system is an old institution that’s usually slower than the rest of society to respond to changes. However, Cambridge University being as influential as it is, may be able to set a trend towards digitising exams. If the tests being conducted by Cambridge prove to be a success, it’s interesting to see what impact it will have not just in the UK but worldwide. Cambridge is an influential institution, so they could be setting a blueprint for the future.

THE FUTURE TECH IN THE TRAVEL INDUSTRY

PROVIDED BY YUMMY LOVE JOURNEY

bigstock–194668567

Technological advancement has been moving at extraordinary speeds over the last couple of decades. New industries have emerged and existing ones are changing. In the travel industry, it was seen as a backward step in technology when the ever-speedy Concorde retired and came out of service. However, the industry is now back at the forefront of technology and embracing how we book and travel. Below are some of the trends shaping the industry.

1. Travelbots

A Travelbot or Chatbot allows travellers to book their travel through a messaging platform such as Facebook Messenger. You can enter your destination, number of nights and dates and the bot will make recommendations allowing you to continue with the booking. Expedia.com is launching on Skype and allows you to search for hotels, book, manage, cancel and confirm reservations. If you have a question the bot can’t answer then you can call Expedia directly free of charge. The bots are powered by Artificial Intelligence (AI) and conversational computing. It allows Travel Agents and Travel Management Companies to engage with the customer earlier on in the booking process. The new generation who have been raised with iPhones and Androids are comfortable not engaging with a person and require simple and intelligent software to allow them to go with a self-service option and book all aspects of their travels independently.

2. Virtual Reality (VR) and Augmented Reality (AR)

VR has already been introduced by airlines to show the various cabins on offer and upgrade passengers into Premium, Business and First class. Qatar, who have just introduced the world’s first double bed use VR to allow passengers to experience the space and new product. Hotels can also use VR to give a full 360-degree immersive experience into the hotel and its rooms. Cruise companies are using VR and AR to sell the variety of ships and cruises on offer, allowing customers to again experience what it would be like to be on the actual ship.

3. Voice interfaces (VI)

A report by Phocuswright suggests that millennials travel more than any other group of travellers. We have already seen how speech recognition in the form of Amazon’s Alexa allows users to access information with ease. The future of VI in the travel industry will allow travellers to seamlessly make requests and bookings through voice recognition whilst also recognising your personal preferences and making suggestions appropriate to your needs.

4. Wearable devices

The introduction of the smartwatch allowed customers to board planes and unlock hotel rooms. This area will continue to grow and provide a more personalised service. In November this year Carnival Cruises will launch a Medallion Class on Princess Cruise Lines which will allow the customer (whilst wearing the medallion) to enable keyless access room entry, personalised concierge service and wallet free payments as well as acting as a social tool to let customers connect after their trip.

By Ulpa Chauhan
Yummy Love Journey

CULINARY APPRENTICESHIPS: A GIFT AND A CURSE

bigstock-Team-of-chefs-preparing-food-i-135995933bigstock-Teacher-Helping-Students-Train-92727146

Bridging the gap between the working world and the education system can be a difficult task, especially for someone who only has a vague idea of what they want to do.

,

POP-UP RESTAURANTS: AN ALTERNATIVE BUSINESS MODEL

When it comes to eating out and shopping, a buzz word that is arguably synonymous with millennials is the word ‘pop-up shop’. The pop-up embodies all things new and trendy and therefore inevitably hipsters and young people flock towards them. This wasn’t ….